Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy also known as coloscopy is the endoscopic examination of the large bowel. It examines the entire colon a fiber optic camera on a flexible tube passed through the anus. It provides a visual diagnosis for any ulceration, polyps and aids for biopsy or removal of suspected colorectal cancer lesions. Colonoscopies are recommended for the conditions such as gastrointestinal haemorrhage, unexplained changes in bowel habit and suspicion of malignancy. Colonoscopies are often used to diagnose colon cancer, but are also frequently used to diagnose inflammatory bowel disease.

Steps taken:

The colon must be free of solid matter for the test to be performed properly. For one to three days, the patient is required to follow a low fiber or clear-liquid only diet. During the procedure the patient is often given sedation intravenously. After the procedure, some recovery time is usually allowed to let the sedative wear off. Outpatient recovery time can take an estimate of 30–60 minutes. It examines the entire colon a fiber optic camera on a flexible tube passed through the anus. It provides a visual diagnosis for any ulceration, polyps and aids for biopsy or removal of suspected colorectal cancer lesions. Overall, colonoscopy is a very safe test, but as with any medical procedure, complications are possible. Complications during a colonoscopy can include perforation, bleeding, post-polypectomy syndrome, reaction to anaesthetic, and infectionAdvantages: An advantage of colonoscopy is the ability to examine the entire colon and as well is capable of removing a polyp I or a growth of excess of tissue that can be visualised during the procedure.

Precautions:

Like any surgical procedure there are risks. patient must inform the doctor of all the medications being consumed, medical history. The patient must discuss all the concerns regarding the procedure prior to undergoing the same. The pre-procedure advice and post-procedure advice must be followed. After the procedure, the patient must refrain from driving, operating heavy machinery, lifting load etc. Alcohol and tobacco consumption must be prohibited.

In case chills, fever, rectal bleeding swelling, abdominal pain, bloating, discomfort with 24 hours following colonoscopy, immediate doctor consultation is advised.

FAQs

Is colonoscopy a routine test for examination?

For adult men above 50 years of age colonoscopy is recommended every 10 years as a part of routine check-up.

Are all polyps cancerous?

No; polyps are excess tissue growth and are usually benign (noncancerous); however few polyps can grow over the year of 10 years and can turn cancerous. Coloscopy can remove polyps during the examination by making changes in the techniques.

What is the side effects following colonoscopy?

One very common aftereffect from the procedure is a bout of flatulence and minor wind pain caused by air insufflation into the colon during the procedure.

What is post-polypectomy syndrome?

Postpolypectomy Syndrome is a syndrome that occurs as a result of a burning to the bowel wall during polyp removal. As a reaction a patient develops fever, abdominal pain, and an elevated white blood cell count after a colonoscopy. Treatment includes treatment with antibiotics and maintaining hydration with intravenous fluids.

What is a perforation?

A perforation is a tear or a hole in the intestine. The risk of perforation is very low after a colonoscopy. It is slightly increased after a colonoscopy during which a polyp is removed. A perforation can occur if an instrument punctures a thin point in the colon wall, or if the air introduced into the colon during the test causes excessive distension.

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